SadVenus

Tuesday, April 05, 2005

Burchfield, Charles

From 1912 to 1916 Burchfield attended the Cleveland School of Art. He returned to his home in Salem, Ohio, where he had an industrial job and in his spare time painted imaginative

Athletics, Modern development

The development of the modern sport, however, has come only since the early 19th century. Organized amateur footraces were held in England as early as 1825, but it was from 1860 that athletics enjoyed its biggest surge to that date. In 1861 the West London Rowing Club organized the first meet open to all amateurs, and in 1866 the Amateur Athletic Club (AAC) was founded and conducted the first

Monday, April 04, 2005

Madison, James

Fourth president of the United States (1809–17) and one of the founding fathers of his country. At the Constitutional Convention (1787) he influenced the planning and ratification of the U.S. Constitution and collaborated with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay in the publication of The Federalist Papers. As a member of the new House of Representatives, he sponsored the first 10 amendments to the Constitution, commonly called the Bill of Rights. He was secretary of state under President Thomas Jefferson when the Louisiana Territory was purchased from France. The War of 1812 was fought during his presidency. (For a discussion of the history and nature of the presidency, see presidency of the United States of America. See also Cabinet of President James Madison.)

Sunday, April 03, 2005

Conditioning

In physiology, a behavioral process whereby a response becomes more frequent or more predictable in a given environment as a result of reinforcement (providing a natural stimulus or reward for the desired response). The history of this concept shows its dependence upon experimental techniques for the study of reflexes. Physiologists in Russia, England, and the

Grace

Greek  Charis,  plural  Charites,  Latin  Gratia,   in Greek religion, one of a group of goddesses of fertility. The name refers to the “pleasing” or “charming” appearance of a fertile field or garden. The number of Graces varied in different legends, but usually there were three: Aglaia (Brightness), Euphrosyne (Joyfulness), and Thalia (Bloom). They are said to be daughters of Zeus and Hera (or Eurynome, daughter of Oceanus) or of

Saturday, April 02, 2005

Irene Ducas

When Alexius became emperor in April 1081 he reportedly planned to repudiate Irene and wed Mary, who had been married to the former emperors Michael VII

Friday, April 01, 2005

Pori

Swedish  Björneborg,   city, Turun ja Porin (Turku ja Pori) lääni (province), southwestern Finland. It lies along the Kokemäen River near the Gulf of Bothnia, north-northwest of Turku. Originally settled in the 12th century farther up the Kokemäen and chartered as Ulvila in 1365, it was moved to its present site in 1558. It was destroyed by fire in the 16th and 19th centuries but was rebuilt both times because of

Dumbarton Oaks Conference

This conference constituted the first important step taken to carry out paragraph 4 of the Moscow

Thursday, March 31, 2005

Siddons, Sarah

She was the eldest of 12 children of Roger and Sarah Kemble, who led a troupe of traveling actors (and were progenitors of a noted family of actors to a third generation, including a famous granddaughter, Fanny Kemble). Through the special care of her mother in sending

Wednesday, March 30, 2005

Louis, Victor

After at least seven unsuccessful attempts, Louis won the Prix de Rome in 1755. While in Rome (1756–59), he offended the director of the Academy there, Charles Joseph Natoire, and this social misstep resulted in his subsequent exclusion from